End of an Old Farmhouse

In the end it was a hard decision. But, the deciding factor was ultimately money.

There was just too much wrong with the house. And potential fixes could have run upward to $40-50k… or more. Yet any money that was put into fixing the house would have been wasted. We’d still have a very old house, with many old problems. It would’ve been “good money after bad.”

With too much mold growing in several leaky ceiling locations I felt it was a health hazard to even live in there temporarily. I’ve been in some pretty rustic conditions, but constant exposure to mold is something I won’t do voluntarily. I was even prepared to put up with the spiders and the mice and the rusty bathroom fixtures in the short term.

The little house stood for over 100 years and sheltered several families over the decades. But, when it came down it was pretty apparent that it was built as cheaply as possible from the ground up. I definitely got the impression it was the cheapest and quickest shelter the very first owners could construct. It kind of had the feel of a kids’ treehouse fort that was improved with new siding and roofing over the years.

A few pics of the demolition process….

The demolition company was able to salvage quite a bit of metal from the structure.
The demolition company was able to salvage quite a bit of metal from the structure.
The garage end of the house was the last to go.
The garage end of the house was the last to go.
Everything was turned into a pile and pushed into the small hole of a basement. Driving on top of the pile I'm sure helped to break down the pieces for easier handling.
Everything was turned into a pile and pushed into the small hole of a basement. Driving on top of the pile I’m sure helped to break down the pieces for easier handling.
Everything was then loaded into several dump truck loads and taken to the landfill after the metal was separated out. Yep, the landfill. Regulations prohibit disposing of old house material on site, or burning it in a bonfire.  Too much toxic stuff, presumably.
Everything was then loaded into several dump truck loads and taken to the landfill after the metal was separated out. Yep, the landfill. Regulations prohibit disposing of old house material on site, or burning it in a bonfire. Too much toxic stuff, presumably.

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